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Dogmann

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Everything posted by Dogmann

  1. OK everyone in NSW. There is an online survey underway which asks about the suitability of the RSPCA and the Animal Welfare League to administer animal cruelty law in NSW. It hasn’t been publicised and we certainly haven’t been informed about it but one of our people spotted it anyway... It closes on November 29. Please take the time to fill it out. We take the view that animal cruelty law should be administered by the police or a properly constituted government agency rather than a politically active lobby group. Up to you to answer the questions as you see fit. However, please remember, if you choose to fill it out, be respectful and play the ball not the man. You will be looking to have your views considered worth reading by people who are looking at perhaps recommending changes to the way things are done now. Don’t vent. Explain why you hold your views and don’t get political. This is a very important survey. Look for the link within the link posted below and be smart and calm. If you would like help putting some words together, ask. We are happy to offer some suggestions for you to consider if you think that will help you make you’re point. Cheers, Ned. https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/listofcommittees/Pages/committee-details.aspx?pk=263
  2. The Daily Liberal has published our response today.... The Australian Pig Doggers and Hunters Association say ban call is baffling By Craig Thomson The Australian Pig Doggers and Hunters Association (APDHA) has congratulated deputy mayor Stephen Lawrence for his support of pig dogging. APDHA National Vice President Ned Makim said a ban on pig dogging would directly threaten a national African Swine Fever early warning strategy designed to link hunters, domestic pork producers and government agencies from coast to coast. Cr Lawrence recently slammed shadow treasurer Walt Secord's call for a ban on pig dogging. Mr Makim said Mr Secord's call was, at best, an ill-considered headline grab which had the potential to do real harm to Australia's Biosecurity. "Mr Lawrence's response displays a greater understanding of the pressure under which our primary producers are operating and the contribution legal, ethical hunters can make to the community," he said. "Pig hunters, through APDHA, have been instrumental in bringing together a national awareness campaign on the threat posed by African Swine Fever which has already reached East Timor. "The APDHA is also partnering with the Northern Territory's Department of Primary Industry and Resources and Australian Pork Ltd to develop a wild pig population sampling program to flag any incursion of AFS through the northern wetlands." Mr Makim said the APDHA represent thousands of legal, ethical hunters who fully support a proactive stance on African Swine Fever. "Indeed our quick movement to organise representatives to undergo wildlife disease investigation training under the direction of the NT's DPI and R Biosecurity and Animal Welfare Group has demonstrated the commitment of pig hunters to support their communities against this genuine disease threat," he said. "Why, at this crucial time, would anyone be seeking to eliminate a key group in the nation's Biosecurity strategy?" Mr Makim said the timing of Mr Secord's attack on legal hunters indicated he either did not know anything about the African Swine Fever threat or did not care. "Either way, it's a bizarre position for an MP to take." Mr Makim said the APDHA was also in the process of calling a meeting of all hunting organisations to expand the field surveillance potential of the hunting community further. He said the Association was already deeply engaged in the Queensland government and industry response to the ASF threat and had received the backing of Federal Agriculture Minister Senator Bridget McKenzie for the organisation's National awareness campaign. He said pig dogging was a significant contributor to the economy through its roles in the management of a serious pest species and the financial outlay by professional and part-time hunters on equipment, fuel and vehicles. "It's also an essential tool in the range of methods available to control feral pig numbers. As soon as you seek to eliminate one of the options for pig management at the disposal of private and public landholders and managers, you weaken the entire strategy," Mr Makim said. "We understand some sectors of the community can find pig dogging challenging. That's why we continue to work with governments and industry groups Australia-wide to make sure what we are doing meets all legal requirements, particularly concerning animal welfare. "I just can't understand Mr Secord's motivation to launch such an emotive and bigoted attack on legal hunters, especially at a time they were working to defend not only our natural environment but the domestic pork industry as well."
  3. Had a few people blowing up to me about the unfairness of it all.... These people, who attack us, don’t give a about us, the cockies, what we do, whatever. It’s all part of the game. They want headlines so their voters can say ‘look at Fred. He’s fighting for us, we should support him’. all of them are staunch. We just have to counter as best we can and embed ourselves as best we can with government departments, industry bodies, anyone. The African Swine Fever thing is a great example. The NT committee members built good relationships to the point at which various important people asked to come to our AGM. (First time ever...) Those people told us they thought AFS was very important. So it became very important to us and we started talking to members and others about it. Nek minut...we are being recognised by the Federal Ag Minister, in public, for our hard work... Don’t get bogged down in what’s fair. We win or we lose based on the rules of the game and fair has got nothing to do with it. Stay cool, stay calm but focus and aim. That’s the heart of our media and PR strategy. I’ll say now it is very hard for me to not blow up about most of the s*** that’s said about us. However, if I issue get notices all over the place, the media won’t touch me. As it stands, the media is running lots of what we say, we are developing friendships in high places and we are showing we are useful in an emergency. What individuals can do is keep themselves clean and calm, encourage their friends to stay calm and respectful and work to educate young blokes, the uneducated and dumb bastards to keep damaging s*** off social media. Rant concludes haha...
  4. This is our response... Our response to the latest call to ban us... (See the relevant report below) A NSW Labor MPs call to ban pig dogging is a direct threat to a national African Swine Fever early warning strategy designed to link hunters, domestic pork producers and government agencies from coast to coast. Pig hunters, through the Australian Pig Doggers and Hunters Association, have been instrumental in bringing together a national awareness campaign on the threat posed by African Swine Fever which has already reach East Timor. The APDHA is also partnering with the Northern Territory’s Department of Primary Industry and Resources and Australian Pork Ltd to develop a wild pig population sampling program to flag any incursion of AFS through the northern wetlands. APDHA National Vice President Mr Ned Makim said yesterday’s call by NSW Labor’s treasury spokesman Walt Secord was, at best, an ill considered headline grab which had the potential to do real harm to Australia’s Biosecurity. “We (the APDHA) represent thousands of legal, ethical hunters who have fully supported the management committee’s proactive stance on African Swine Fever. “Indeed our quick movement to organise representatives to undergo wildlife disease investigation training under the direction of the NT’s DPI and R Biosecurity and Animal Welfare Group has demonstrated the commitment of pig hunters to support their communities against this very real disease threat. “Why, at this crucial time would anyone be seeking to eliminate a key group in the nation’s Biosecurity strategy?” Mr Makim said the timing of Mr Secord’s attack on legal hunters indicated he either did not know anything about the African Swine Fever threat or did not care. “Either way, it’s a bizarre position for an MP to take.” Mr Makim said the APDHA was also in the process of calling a meeting of all hunting organisations to further expand the potential field surveillance potential of the hunting community, was already deeply engaged in the Queensland government and industry response to the ASF threat and had received the backing of Federal Agriculture Minister Senator Bridget McKenzie for the organisation’s National at awareness campaign. He said pigdogging was a major contributor to the economy through its roles in the management of a serious pest species and the financial outlay by professional and part time hunters on equipment, fuel and vehicles. “It’s also an essential tool in the range of methods available to control feral pig numbers. As soon as you seek to eliminate one of the options for pig management at the disposal of private and public landholders and managers, you weaken the entire strategy. “We understand some sectors of the community can find pig dogging challenging. That’s why we continue to work with governments and industry groups Australia-wide to make sure what we are doing meets all legal requirements particularly in relation to animal welfare. “I just can’t understand Mr Secord’s motivation to launch such an emotive and bigoted attack on legal hunters, especially at a time they were working to defend not only our natural environment but the domestic pork industry as well…”
  5. Another call to ban legal, ethical hunters... The APDHA has been asked for a response and will provide it next half hour. When it will make the paper is a matter for the newsroom but there are already positives. The first is that the APDHA has been asked to add its voice to the discussion on behalf of hunters. The second is that pig Doggers have already been defended in print by Dubbo community representatives. That’s the good news here. Now please consider any public responses you might want to make on the matter. The haters will be looking for evidence that we are all just boofheads and aggressive as well. Be calm, be respectful and watch your language. WWE are being supported by the Dubbo community. Show them we are worthy of that support... https://www.facebook.com/193856020648207/posts/2853213068045809?sfns=mo
  6. Sorry for the layout. The article came in with some coding on it I cant remove yet. I'll work on it.
  7. One of the APDHA's partners in this awareness program is the group representing Australian commercial pork producers, Australian Pork Ltd. General Manager, Policy Deb Kerr recently flew to Darwin to talk specifically with the APDHA about pig hunters' role in African Swine Fever (ASF) awareness and management...The key issue right now is that ASF is in East Timor about 650km from the NT and it has the potential to wipe out the commercial and wild pig herds if not managed correctly. This is Australian Pork Ltd's position on the issue...(Note the graphic we have used is from Europe and some minor points won't apply here. However, the broad message remains relevant. The APDHA is working on graphics for Australian conditions.) Deadly disease and Australia’s feral pigs By Deb Kerr, Australian Pork Ltd, General Manager Policy You must have been living on Mars if you have not heard of African swine fever (ASF) and its devastating spread throughout Asia. It’s estimated that 25 per cent of the world’s domestic pigs are or will be dead as a result of the disease. Australia’s domestic and feral pig herd are naïve to the significant pig diseases overseas meaning any incursion will inevitably result in high mortality rates – potentially up to 100 per cent. This nasty virus is extremely hardy – it survives in frozen meat for years, will live without a host for six weeks or more, and it tolerates extremes of pH. Heat will kill the virus, but this must be for at least 100°C for 60 minutes. This means that the cooking of most processed pork products will not deactivate the virus. Can you imagine how difficult it will be to eradicate it from a piggery and the environment? Australian Pork Limited (APL) is working with Australian governments to ensure Australia’s border biosecurity is robust, that governments are prepared should the disease come to Australia, and with commercial producers and domestic pig owners to ramp up their on-farm biosecurity. An ASF incursion will result in the closure of export markets – including the feral pig meat trade to the EU. The impacts to the commercial pig industry will range from up to $900M over three years for a small incursion to $2B over five years for a large multi-state incursion. These figures are conservative at best. Everyone has a role to help keep this nasty virus out of Australia. Travellers should not bring any pork or pork products to Australia and online ordering of pork meat should be stopped. These are our biggest risk pathways and we urge all Australians and visitors alike to respect these requirements. Our hunting and pig dogging community has an important role to play in surveillance of the feral pig population. If you see multiple deaths of groups of feral pigs, or significant still births/abortions, please take the GPS coordinates and report these to your state authorities. They will investigate and take samples for testing. Another important issue is allegations that some people transport and release feral pigs from one region to another. If anyone is doing this or considering doing it they need to stop immediately. If feral pigs have the disease, transporting them live will spread it around the country. APL is working with the Australian Pig Doggers and Hunters Association and the Australian Government to see if a surveillance program can be put in place. If there is no disease, a surveillance program that includes testing of feral pig ear samples for disease will help to underpin Australia’s ongoing freedom for a number of exotic diseases. Should an ASF incursion occur, the program will be important to underpin our efforts to be reclassified as free of the disease. This will be critical to our export markets re-opening for the trade of Australian pork and pork products, including the feral pig meat trade to the EU. And finally, please put the disease hotline number 1800 675 888 in your phone. If you see anything suspicious, please call this number and report it to your state government authority.
  8. From the NT Department of Primary Industry and Resources. African swine fever has been confirmed in countries close to Australia including Timor Leste. Travellers, pig owners and hunters should follow the advice below. African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious disease of pigs. It doesn't affect human health. An ASF outbreak in Australia would have a serious impact on the pork and agriculture industries. How it spreads ASF spreads easily by direct contact between affected pigs or by exposure to contaminated items including: feed feed ingredients equipment vehicles clothing and footwear. It can also be spread through meat from infected animals. The virus survives under most environmental conditions and is resistant to most disinfectants. It is not inactivated by freezing or heat less than 100 degrees celsius. Travellers: your responsibilities The most likely way ASF can enter Australia is through international travel and mail. Declare goods when entering Australia You must declare certain food, animal products and plant material when arriving in Australia. If you don't declare goods that may risk Australia’s biosecurity, you could be fined or prosecuted. Check your mail Don't order animal or food products containing meat from overseas though the mail. You must make a report if you receive international mail that contains meat or animal products. Do this on the Australian Government's Department of Agriculture website. Pig owners: your responsibilities You should take precautions to keep Australia free from ASF. Don't feed swill to pigs Food that contains meat or meat products, or that has had contact with meat or meat products, is known as swill. It is illegal to feed swill to pigs. You can feed your pigs: commercially prepared pig feeds grains fruit and vegetables that have not had contact with meat Australian milk and by-products. To find out more read the Agnote on prohibited pig feed. Get a property identification code You must register a property identification code (PIC) if you own pigs. It is free to get a PIC and can be done online. The PIC system allows animals to be easily traced if an animal disease outbreak takes place. Failure to register a PIC can incur penalties. Check for signs of disease You should report any signs of disease immediately by calling the Emergency Animal Disease Hotline on 1800 675 888. Symptoms of ASF include: sudden death high fever and loss of appetite lethargy skin reddening blueness of extremities (including ears) bloody diarrhoea vomiting abortions. Find your nearest government vet. Complete a waybill if your pigs move If you plan to move your pigs, you must complete an NT waybill. This is an official record of livestock movement, which will allow a biosecurity response team to track animals in the event of an outbreak. Protect your pigs from disease You can minimise biosecurity threats by taking simple measures to protect the health of your pigs and restrict the spread of an outbreak. Find resources to help keep your farm and pigs clean on the farm biosecurity website. Hunters, your responsibilities You can help keep the Territory clean by following simple biosecurity measures when you are out hunting. Clean and disinfect all equipment on site. Clean and bag all carcasses before leaving the hunting area. Report any signs of sick or dead pigs by calling the Emergency Animal Disease Hotline on 1800 675 888. Respect all quarantines and restrictions that are in place. Don't leave food scraps from your meals in hunting areas. Don't hunt wild pigs if you are in contact with domestic pigs. Don't move live animals to new locations without completing an NT waybill. Don't travel with exposed carcasses in the back of a ute. If the disease is found in Australia If ASF is detected in Australia, the Australian Veterinary Emergency Plan would be used to guide the emergency response to the disease. The only way that ASF can be eradicated is through early detection and containment. You can find out more on the Animal Health Australia website. Last updated: 04 October 2019
  9. AFRICAN SWINE FEVER If you haven't already heard of African Swine Fever, now is the time to pay attention. In short it is a disease sweeping the world and has killed about 25 per cent of the world's domestic pig population. It has no cure. It is now in East Timor only about 650kms from the Northern Territory. It has obvious repercussions for our domestic pork production, including the impact on 35,000 jobs. But why should pig hunters care? There are many reasons you should care, beyond the impact to jobs, the nation's food security, worldwide food security and the nation's economy. Hunting access could be eliminated. If ASF (African Swine Fever) reaches us there will be a massive containment operation. That will include closing down hunting access. Hunting access could be eliminated. If ASF (African Swine Fever) reaches us there will be a massive containment operation. That will include closing down hunting access.] Massive wild pig poisoning programs. The wild pig population is seen as a major uncontrolled factor in the potential spread of the disease. Major (aerial) wild pig baiting will be one of the first control measures introduced. New rules on the transport of pig carcases. Because is very resilient, the movement of wild pig carcases could be made illegal. Export trade in wild pigs suspended. What there is left of the export trade would be suspended in line with limitations on carcase movement. We know this because we have been briefed on the issue since before the disease reached East Timor and because of the APDHA's strong relationship with the NT Government. So what can we do? In the NT APDHA members and others will be part of a monitoring system which will include education, sample taking, reporting of possibly diseased animals and control operations. The APDHA will be helping with the provision of sampling equipment, protocols and collating of information. More on that to come.. Elsewhere, we will be asking APDHA members to start collecting samples as part of an early warning system so any potential outbreak is roped off ASAP. The third and possibly most important thing is if you know of anyone who thinks moving live wild pigs around is a smart idea, tell them it isn't , report them, deal with any one of a number of ways but squash it. Pig hunters are sometimes accused of moving pigs to improve hunting opportunities closer to their homes. We know of only two convictions for that sort of thing in the past 15 years in NSW and none anywhere else. However, doing it once from now on could be an absolute disaster for the domestic pig industry and the wild pig hunting lifestyle. Anyone moving wild pigs is directly threatening your hunting. We are working on the necessary processes to assist in the broadscale approach to ASF with people including the NT Department of Primary Industry and Resources and Australian Pork Ltd the domestic pork producers representative body and they are very much onside with pig hunters and their potential contribution. We will keep everyone informed as the situation develops.
  10. I’ve taken Paul hunting a couple of times and he’s stayed at my house. He’s a decent bloke. Up to you blokes whether or not you are comfortable chatting to him but I have been and I’m happy to vouch for him. Just tell him the truth, we are all saints and kind to kittens... Cheers.
  11. Come on. Join the fight. We need all the help we can get. $80 a year... https://www.apdha.org.au/apdha-membership/join-apdha
  12. We got to have our say. It’s late but it’s in print so we are happy with that... And if you think we are doing a good job for you, back us up. Join the APDHA and help fund the fight against the extremists. Australian Pig Doggers and Hunters Association hits back at Qld pig-dogging ban Daniel Bateman, The Cairns Post September 28, 2019 5:00am AUSTRALIA’S official pig dogging body has hit back at claims the sport is cruel to all animals involved. Sydney-based animal welfare group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) this week launched a campaign, calling on the Queensland Government to ban the “blood sport”, suggesting pigs are mauled to death by dogs and dogs can be severely injured by cornered boars. Ned Makim, of the Australian Pig Doggers and Hunters Association (APDHA), accused PETA of a “song and dance act” to inflame Queenslanders. “They’re making unsubstantiated allegations about the vast majority of pig hunters who are operating in an ethical and legal manner,” he said. The Inverell, NSW-based feral pig hunter and dog trainer said the suggestion that farmers switched to trapping pigs, rather than hunting the invasive animals with dogs. “Pigs in groups are run by the matriarchal sow,” he said. “If she’s had a bad experience with a trap previously, she can teach the other pigs in her mob not to go up to the trap. “They’ll go up to them, take all the bait that’s outside, but they just won’t go on.” He said poisoning pigs did not work, either. “I’ve personally seen the matriarchal sow whack little piglets away from poison baits,” he said. “That’s why poison baits don’t work. “Everything works to a degree: shooting from choppers, trapping them, baiting, hunting dogs but no one thing is the solution. “You need to have every single option at your disposal, if you’re going to manage pigs.” Mr Makim said, generally, pig dogging was a well controlled activity nationwide. “We’ve got thousands of members and we have a code of conduct that people sign up to,” he said. “We work educating, not only pig hunters, but all hunters about issues to do with animal welfare. “There’s a community expectation about how pig hunters will conduct themselves.” Leichhardt MP Warren Entsch, who owns a cattle property on the Tablelands, said pig dogging was just one weapon in the arsenal. “Pigs do such an extraordinary amount of damage in our region,” he said. “The breed like rabbits, and if they are not controlled, we would lose the battle on this. “That’s not to say you should be torturing them, but at the end of the day, pig dogging is part of controlling them.” A News Corp poll conducted yesterday showed an overwhelming majority of readers (80 per cent) were supportive of dogs being used to hunt pigs.
  13. The Cairns Post report... It’s an age-old tradition in the region, but animal activists want this ‘blood sport’ stopped in its tracks. Find out their reasons. Daniel Bateman, The Cairns Post September 27, 2019 5:00am ANIMAL activists want pig dogging banned in Queensland, claiming the “blood sport” is cruel to dogs and feral pigs. Sydney-based group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) launched a campaign this week encouraging the public to write to Queensland Agriculture Minister Mark Furner, urging him to take immediate action to ban pig dogging. PETA outreach and partnerships manager Emily Rice said pig dogging – using dogs to hunt and pin down feral pigs – was “insanely cruel” for all animals involved. “Terrified pigs are savaged and sometimes even mauled to death by training dogs, if not found quickly by the hunter, who then stabs or shoots them,” she said. “The dogs are also often hurt after facing pigs, much larger than themselves.” She said trapping and then euthanising was one of the most effective, humane and environmentally friendly techniques for reducing feral pig numbers in the Far North. “Instead of allowing hunters to torment and torture animals in some misguided idea of conservation, the government must fund programs to address the problem without causing so much suffering to both pigs and dogs,” she said. “Making a sport out of the slow and painful deaths of animals is abhorrent.” The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries estimates there are up to six million pigs statewide, with the majority in northern Queensland. Innisfail-based banana farmer Jonny Filby said pig dogging was the most efficient and cost-effective method of controlling feral pigs on his 181ha property, with the animals causing thousands of dollars of damage to his farm each year. Innisfail banana farmer Jonny Filby (right) with his pet dog he takes pig hunting Innisfail banana farmer Jonny Filby (right) with his pet dog he takes pig hunting “I can go out with my dogs on my farm tonight and get 10 pigs in one night,” he said. “If I set a trap, I might get just one.” He said many farmers would be willing to use more traps if feral pig control programs were better funded by the State Government. However, he warned the invasive animals were very intelligent and trapping them was a challenge. “If one gets caught in a trap, the other pigs know what that metal box does,” he said. “You won’t get those other four.” MINISTER’S RESPONSE Agriculture Minister Mark Furner says landholders are legally obliged to manage the impact of feral pigs on their properties, but the animals’ welfare must be considered and feral pig control practices must comply with the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001. “Under the Act, people can use dogs to hunt feral pigs provided it is done in a way that causes the animals as little pain as is reasonable,” he said.
  14. We responded yesterday to the Cairns Post journo looking for the other side of this story but it seems our response didn’t make it to print. They did talk to an Innisfail farmer so that’s something. PETA gets psyched up about pig hunting whenever it needs some donations so this is the latest round. They are always dangerous, of course, because they are happy to lie and they are good at finding idiotic posts and photos by hunters that sail too close to breaking the law. Remember, the law only allows pig hunting with dogs if there is ‘no unnecessary suffering’ for the pigs. That means minimum number of dogs necessary to control the pig, grabbing the pig quickly and killing it quickly. Three dogs on a 20kg pig, someone filming rather than grabbing the pig and someone else holding a pigs back legs while the dogs are still on it are all against the law. Box clever people. The fight goes on.
  15. From the NSW DPI Game Unit... Prolific poacher banned from hunting and owning dogs A prolific poacher, who went on an illegal hunting spree across the Central West, has been successfully fined and prosecuted in Mount Druitt Local Court. The offender was apprehended in Portland NSW in June last year following an extensive joint investigation by the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) Game Licensing Unit (GLU), and the NSW Police Force Rural Crime Prevention Team. The man, who regularly shared his illegal hunting exploits on social media, was charged with numerous offences relating to illegal hunting on public and private land, possession of hunting equipment in State Forests without a hunting permit, and animal cruelty offences. NSW DPI GLU Director, Dr Andrew Moriarty, said the offender, who pleaded guilty last week in court to all alleged offences, is considered prolific in terms of his illegal hunting and animal cruelty offending. “He was fined $5000, issued a 12 month good behaviour bond, a 12 month community corrections order, and is banned from applying for a licence to hunt on public land in NSW for 10 years.” Additionally, under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, the magistrate made an order that prohibits the man from owning dogs, residing in a house where dogs are kept, and travelling in a vehicle with dogs used for hunting for a period of five years. “This has turned out to be a landmark result for illegal hunting offences in NSW. In a one month period in May 2018, the offender entered private property to hunt without permission 57 times,” Dr Moriarty said. “Our farmers are currently doing it tough due to the drought and entering private property to hunt without permission has the potential to introduce biosecurity risks and disturb weak stock that could further impact our already strained farming industries, let’s not underestimate the toll on a farmer’s wellbeing by the loss of their sense of security. “Licensed and responsible hunters can play an important role in NSW by contributing to regional economics and helping to control problem wildlife and pests, and the actions of poachers like this offender threaten their efforts.” Local communities and persons are urged to report illegal hunting activity through the joint GLU and NSW Police program, Shut the Gate on Illegal Hunting. Reports can be made anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.
  16. Heads up everyone. It’s almost time for this year’s annual general meeting in Darwin NT. It will be on August 31 at the Livingstone Recreation Reserve hall. We’ll come back to you with times and the speakers’ list. Get there if you can... https://northernterritory.com/darwin-and-surrounds/destinations/darwin
  17. As part of the ongoing review of our operations, the Committee of Management has identified that our original Constitution, adopted when the APDHA formed in 2005, has not kept pace with the changing legal requirements for a representative body such as ours. We believe there are legal holes in the original document which leave the association and the members open to potential challenge from those who would like to see us removed from our role in defending your lifestyle and your future. On that basis we engaged a legal firm, Devenish Law, to review the Constitution and oversee suggested changes. However, nothing can happen until members have their say. We need your support to make the changes necessary to take us into the future, better equipped to handle the challenges to come. To change our Constitution we are required to put the matter to a vote, postal and/or in person with 75 per cent of votes received in favour of the move. The process is required to take no less than 60 days and every member must have the opportunity to vote either by post or in person at an extraordinary general meeting. To help you consider the issue, the old and the proposed new Constitutions will be in one place on the forum for members to read. The details of how to vote have been mailed to the addresses we have on record for all members so if you want to make sure your address is correct contact the office at info@apdha.org.au or call on 1300 364 648. Thanks.
  18. Go to 4:10 in this video to hear pig hunters given some praise in Qld Parliament. Only the second time we can find that pig hunters have been mentioned positively in any Parliament in Australia. First time was in NSW in 2011 by Robert Borsak of the Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party. This time it’s by Shane Knuth of Katters Australia Party. Make a note of who stands up for us and stand up for them. https://www.facebook.com/shaneknuthmp/videos/vb.180764285343226/571395913362730/?type=2&theater
  19. Things are even better. RSPCA NSW reached out to the APDHA today and while not saying sorry, came as close to it as they could. This is what they said: I would like to clarify some of the information that has been misrepresented in the article. The Information provided to the journalist did not go through the proper channels and was not authorised by RSPCA NSW. Claims in the article are factually incorrect and RSPCA NSW have no plans to drive dog owners out-of-town to less populated areas. RSPCA NSW does not endorse the idea that there are ‘dangerous’ breeds of dogs that should be removed from the local community. The RSPCA does not consider any dog of any size, breed or mix of breeds to be more dangerous and thus dogs should not be declared dangerous based on breed or appearance. Each individual dog should be assessed based on their behaviour. RSPCA NSW also takes issue with the examples of alleged hunting dog attacks used in the article, including the incident involving the one-year-old toddler in Inverell, as we fail to see the relevant connection between the incident and the messaging of this article. Because of the points raised above, RSPCA NSW requested a full retraction of the article and for the online version of the article to be taken down immediately. This is rare win for us. Now we have a tentative agreement to open up a line of communication to find what common ground we have while accepting their corporate position will be to oppose hunting and our will be to support it. This might not seem like much but it is. We are never going to be best friends but if we can work out a professional relationship there is less likelihood of media wars in the future.
  20. The RSPCA shafting their own rep was a bloody bonus. Took a bit of manoeuvring but pleasantly surprised by the turnaround.
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